Comment 41213

By Jarod (registered) | Posted May 28, 2010 at 11:30:35

Should have heard some of the comments from people calling in on the Bill Kelly show this morning...wow.

It always amazes me how people can fail to see the obvious good in things. Among the callers this morning were two company drivers who were infuriated and thought, "we need to remove the people who are doing this."

How much longer is it going to take to drive the city? THAT much longer? Not likely. Right now we can pass trough Hamilton in a relatively short period of time. Besides, not a SINGLE CALLER from what I heard gave an economic perspective of what two-way conversion would do.

And Bill, in all his splendor, gives us the truth of what a lot of pig-headed people are thinking.

"Wanting to make an area more pedestrian friendly and safer is all good, but at what cost? It seems like people are thinking of any mode of transportation except for drivers. People forget, Canada loves their cars." ---- Frig. Really? Let's take a small trip to the states and attempt a car culture comparison. Canada shouldn't want to become that. (though I love the states, I say chew the meat, spit out the bones)

At what point do we lose our politeness to defend the good things that are happening? Is it the right thing to do? Sit back and wait for the other people to finish talking? Shouldn't these (radio) programs be overwhelmed with callers from this lovely site, showing and telling people who are listening that a one sided argument will not be tolerated? ...and of course I'm a huge hypocrite because I didn't call in in time...ugh...wish I wasn't such a meek person (hahaha)

I know I'm preaching to the choir...or showing the building designs to the architect if you prefer that phrase, but how do we get people to step back and realize that these ARE GOOD THINGS?

Besides, human nature is adaptive. We can adapt. We have the technology.

Rant over. Enjoy the sun, it's gorgeous!

Comment edited by Jarod on 2010-05-28 10:32:35

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