Comment 52449

By slodrive (registered) | Posted December 01, 2010 at 13:57:40

@Undustrial -- very true. You could say the same thing about some of the in-demand areas of Toronto. In fact, I know a very successful director who sought out a west-downtown Toronto neighbourhood for it's uhhh, "mosaic" shall we say. He stated he loved the nice urban setting that had some close proximity to a healthy dose of 'character'.

Even where I'm working, I know a few cases where that sought after young, creative, successful-type is locating in downtown Hamilton...and loving it.

Personally, I'm a 'burbanite (for various reasons, many borne of compromise) that would relish the opportunity to commute via public transit to work in downtown Hamilton. Thankfully (..and this is a matter of my own opinion) I feel I'm informed enough to understand the dynamics that show the 'burbs over-indexes in the benefits paid for by taxes. Thus, I whole-heartedly support the reinvigoration of our downtown. (And, even selfishly seeing that a thriving downtown would ease my own tax burden -- not that we'd ever see a drop. But resources and upgrades could be more frequent, functionality and aesthetics would improve and, thus, ("but what about me?!?!?) my property values would likely rise in relativity to improved (perceived) quality of life and proximity to opportunity.

This is what needs to be sold to the average sleepy suburbanite. Generally, people aren't living in the suburbs because they want to concern themselves with other people's problems. Quite the contrary -- hence the 12 foot fences and privacy shrubs. But, not all can be painted with that brush. Many are quasi-real estate investors or seeking familiarity from their own childhood lifestyle...or, it simply floats their boat. Many of these folks do see the world beyond the end of their driveway. But, selling the idea that a better downtown Hamilton means something to the dude in Dundas could help move these initiatives along.

Permalink | Context

Events Calendar

Recent Articles

Article Archives

Blog Archives

Site Tools

Feeds